Disrespect? Respect? Easy Way to Tell the Difference

CTDWTRP Quote Block Black Respect Values ... Disrespect Devalues

KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Founder Social Entrepreneur Author Artist Speaker

www.connectingthedotswiththerespectprinciple.com

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2018

December 7, 2018

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Ultimately, We All Pay for the Acts of Others

Wonderful that some men are stepping up and speaking out, but the thing is, domestic violence is everyone’s problem because whether a person is the abuser, the abused, or the bystanders, there are consequences that include others, including society, which we all pay for in the short term and long run.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/dec/04/domestic-violence-abuse-patrick-stewart-david-challen-hart-brothers

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KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Founder Social Entrepreneur Author Artist Speaker

www.connectingthedotswiththerespectprinciple.com

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2018

December 7, 2018

FEMICIDE Report Reveals, in Canada, Especially in Ontario, Women and Girls Are Being Killed Every Other Day Because They Are Women and Girls

Excerpts from the new report ..
Worldwide, women face the greatest risk of femicide in the context of their intimate relationships with men and this is true for women in Canada as well.
In the first eight months of 2018, 106 women and girls have been killed in Canada, primarily by men. On average, this is one woman or girl killed every other day in this country – a consistent trend for four decades
The CFOJA (Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability) defines femicide as the killing of women and girls because they are women and girls primarily, but not exclusively, by men.
1. Femicide is a distinct form of homicide that warrants its own label. When women and girls are killed, it is almost always by men in the context of their intimate relationships and/or the result of sexual violence. This is very different from the killings of men, which are more commonly the result of male-on-male violence by friends, acquaintances and strangers, a finding that is consistently documented nationally (David, 2017) and
internationally (UNODC 2013).
2. Given the above, regardless of whether the homicide victims are women or men, the perpetrators are most commonly, and overwhelmingly, men. As such, men are commonly both victims and perpetrators of homicide. Women are primarily victims.
3. Finally, the CFOJA is the only Canadian initiative responding to the international call from the United Nations for every country to establish femicide watches or observatories …
  • During the first eight months of 2018, 106 women and girls were killed in Canada, primarily by men. On average, this means that one woman or girl is killed every other day in this country, a consistent trend during the past four decades.
  • There is increasing attention to the vulnerability of older women because of their growing representation in the population. Almost one-third of the femicide victims were aged 55 and older, supporting the recognized need for priority attention to this group of victims.
  • Indigenous women and girls continue to be over represented as victims of femicide
  • Almost half of the femicide victims were killed in their homes. This means that women are at greatest risk where they should feel safest.
  • Shooting was the most common method of killing where this information was documented.
  • One-third of identified accused were male partners of the victims. Three-quarters of these accused were still in an intimate partner relationship with the victim and one quarter were in dating relationships. These patterns underscore the importance of pending Criminal Code changes to capture dating relationships and current legislation which directs judges to treat intimacy as an aggravating factor in sentencing.

Click on this link to read the full report https://femicideincanada.ca/sites/default/files/2018-09/CFOJA%20FINAL%20REPORT%20ENG%20V3.pdf

Also visit the site https://www.femicideincanada.ca

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KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Founder Social Entrepreneur Author Artist Speaker

www.connectingthedotswiththerespectprinciple.com

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2018

December 6, 2018

Consequences of Controlling and Sterilizing Children’s Play

“When my daughter was about 10, my husband suddenly realized that in her whole life, she had probably not spent more than 10 minutes unsupervised by an adult. Not 10 minutes in 10 years.”

“In the real world, life is filled with risks—financial, physical, emotional, social—and reasonable risks are essential for children’s healthy development.”

“Now our working assumption is that children cannot be trusted to find their way around tricky physical or social and emotional situations.”

“… watched as one by one the playgrounds in her neighborhood were transformed into sterile, boring places. Sandseter had written her master’s dissertation on young teens and their need for sensation and risk; she’d noticed that if they couldn’t feed that desire in some socially acceptable way, some would turn to more-reckless behavior. She wondered whether a similar dynamic might take hold among younger kids as playgrounds started to become safer and less interesting.”

“Children, she concluded, have a sensory need to taste danger and excitement; this doesn’t mean that what they do has to actually be dangerous, only that they feel they are taking a great risk. That scares them, but then they overcome the fear.”

“Even today, growing up is a process of managing fears and learning to arrive at sound decisions … but if they never go through that process, the fear can turn into a phobia.”

Excerpts from “The Overprotected Kid”

by Hanna Rossin in The Atlantic, March 20, 2014

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-overprotected-kid-573320270

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KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Founder Social Entrepreneur Author Artist Speaker

www.connectingthedotswiththerespectprinciple.com

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2018

December 5, 2018

 

ON CREATIVITY “It is a chaotic strangeness familiar to every creative person, be she poet or physicist or composer …”

“I carry my thoughts about with me for a long time, sometimes a very long time, before I set them down. At the same time my memory is so faithful to me that I am sure not to forget a theme which I have once conceived, even after five years have passed. I make many changes, reject and reattempt until I am satisfied. Then the working-out in breadth, length, height and depth begins in my head, and since I am conscious of what I want, the basic idea never leaves me. It rises, grows upward, and I hear and see the picture as a whole take shape and stand forth before me as though cast in a single piece, so that all that is left is the work of writing it down.”

“Whence I take my ideas… I cannot say with any degree of certainty; they come to me uninvited, directly, or indirectly. I could almost grasp them in my hands, out in nature’s open, in the woods, during my promenades, in the silence of the night, at earliest dawn. They are roused by moods which in the poet’s case are transmuted into words, and in mine into tones, that sound, roar and storm until at last they take shape for me as notes.”

Ludwig van Beethoven

This experience I have come to know well and as with Beethoven, being outside is when most ideas arrive. I too also carry them for a long time, such as the idea of respect as a global principle that entered my mind over twenty years ago and is now manifesting in unexpected ways.

I also appreciated Maria Popova sharing in her article on brainpickings, titled

Incubation, Ideation, and the Art of Editing: Beethoven on Creativity

that creativity is not just about art making, but also discovery and innovation.

Quoting author Mary Shelley of Frankenstein fame, Freema Dyson, physicist, T.S. Eliot, Ludwig van Beethoven and more, light is shone on a process many seek to understand. Learn more by reading the Maria’s whole article @

https://www.brainpickings.org/2018/11/25/beethoven-on-creativity/

December 4, 2018

KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Founder Social Entrepreneur Author Artist Speaker

www.connectingthedotswiththerespectprinciple.com

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2018

 

 

“The “I Turned Out Just Fine” argument is popular … but the argument has FATAL FLAWS”

The “I turned out just fine” argument is popular. It means that based on our personal experience we know what works and what doesn’t.

But the argument has fatal flaws.

It’s what’s known as an anecdotal fallacy. This fallacy, in simple terms, states that “I’m not negatively affected (as far as I can tell), so it must be O.K. for everyone.” As an example: “I wasn’t vaccinated, and I turned out fine. Therefore, vaccination is unnecessary.” We are relying on a sample size of one. Ourselves, or someone we know. And we are applying that result to everyone.

Read Justin Coulson’s article in the New York times by clicking on the image below …

Recognizing that our own experiences and the impact they had on us does not reflect how those experiences may impact others is one of the greatest gifts we can give others. When we demonstrate by our thoughts, words, and actions that we realize we are all different and often experience life differently, we open the door to respecting others … we open our hearts and our minds that empowers us to be compassionate, kind, and caring, plus committed to protecting children from preventable, unnecessary harm.

December 2, 2018

KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Founder Social Entrepreneur Author Artist Speaker

www.connectingthedotswiththerespectprinciple.com

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2018