“Money Talk: She makes triple his salary”

“Peter: [Now that we’re married] we both have the same viewpoint on what we want to spend money on, and most of the time it’s not stuff, it’s experiences.”

“Vanessa: I haven’t made the comparison of how much disposable income or purchasing power I have now to buy things like shoes and bags vs. what I did when I was single. I want to say that it’s actually increased, at least that’s how it feels, because there’s just a financial benefit to being married. You’re spending as much money, or maybe more, if you’re cooking for one person than if you’re cooking for two. That’s where the savings really is. His additional $40,000 contributes to our pooled income, but we only need to buy one bedspread. That’s where it feels like both of our purchasing power has increased by combining our incomes.”

Quotes and linked article by Nicole Dieker for Vox

https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/9/3/20812244/partner-marriage-outearn-spouse-imbalance

Shared by

KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Writer, Founder and President of Connecting The Dots With The Respect Principle

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2019 

September 10, 2019

Advertisements

“The US (and Canadian) Labor Shortage Explained” and What Needs to Happen

Applicable to Canada as well as many of us Canadians know, especially since the introduction of contract part-time work that pays no benefits and is either minimum wage or slightly above, while also expecting “contract” people to use provide and use their own capital for an employer’s benefit, such as, but not limited to, computers, Wifi, and vehicles.

“Companies looking to attract enough blue-collar workers will have to continue increasing wages and, as a result, possibly experience diminished profits,” wrote Gad Levanon, chief economist for North America at the Conference Board, a global economic research organization that has studied the recent US labor shortage.

Slow income growth has been the most persistent problem affecting the US economy in its recovery from the Great Recession. Wages have barely kept up with the cost of living, even as the unemployment rate dropped and the economy expanded.

 With such a tight labor market and rising productivity, workers should expect much bigger pay raises than they’re getting.

Private sector workers (excluding farmworkers) got a measly 8-cent average hourly raise in July, adding up to an average pay of $27.98 an hour. Workers’ wages only grew about 1.6 percent in the past year, after adjusting for inflation.

While that’s faster than wages have been growing since the recession started in 2007, it’s still a pathetic amount compared to the sky-high payouts corporate CEOs are getting.

But raising wages will only do so much to ease the labor shortage. Businesses will need to hire more foreign workers too.

Excerpts from the following linked article by Alexia Campbell for Vox

https://www.vox.com/2019/8/12/20801941/us-labor-shortage-workers-quit

Shared by

KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Writer, Founder and President of

Connecting The Dots With The Respect Principle

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2019 

August 16, 2019

 

“Where is Workforce Really Booming? Among the Oldest Workers”

Why We Wrote This

“By conventional reckoning, someone at 65 years old or even 55 is “retirement age.” But labels are being lifted as older people stay active – and as employers see value in hiring them.”

By Laurent Belsie for The Christian Science Monitor

https://www.csmonitor.com/Business/2019/0524/Where-is-workforce-really-booming-Among-the-oldest-workers?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Shared by

KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Advocate Innovator Writer Social Entrepreneur & Founder

Connecting The Dots With The Respect Principle

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2019 

June 6, 2019