Why Self Discovery is the KEY to SUCCESS on All Levels

WHY SELF DISCOVERY is KEY to SUCCESS on ALL LEVELS

If I knew the whole of me earlier, plus had the courage and confidence to be me all my life, my life now would look immensely different.

Flashing back in time, the three tribes I would have joined early in life were the nerds, the artists, and the athletes because I love to learn, am highly creative, and inherited a strong drive to be athletic.

If nurtured to discover and embrace my inherent talents at a young age, plus to discover the many different avenues my talents and passions could lead me to, I would likely have acquired three degrees. The first degree would be in English and liberal arts, empowering me to be the writer I did know at a young age I wanted to be, rather than the pressure to bury such a “foolish” venture. Another degree would be in the fields of humanities, social science and psychology. The third would have been a masters in business administration.

A lifetime later, the patchwork of my history reveals that though I did not gain the degrees, I certainly gained diverse knowledge, and yes, even expertise, in these fields of study.

Let me show you by providing a very different style of resume I created, not just for a job I applied for, but for me to put my experiences in perspective and to shed light on my inherent and developed skills.

RESUME

Early Years

  • “A” student in elementary school, but by junior high school, my unusual personality type resulted in experiencing social challenges at home and in school so I quit at age sixteen to marry. No children though
  • Divorced and remarried. By age 21, promoted to Assistant Manager at People’s department store, plus did payroll, banking, and closed store. Left because of area supervisor’s sexual harassment
  • Hired as part-time cashier at Krupps, promoted within a few months to full time and Head Cashier. Hired, trained, and scheduled fifteen part-time and full time cashiers. Closed and opened safe and store, balanced cash, banking, customer accounts, and accounts payable. Promoted to Executive Assistant. Proposed and wrote policies and procedures training manual. Management Team member that contributed to the business doubling in size and sales over seven years
  • Efficiency and effectiveness abilities empowered me to cut my workweek from five to four days to take on another role as an Aerobics Instructor. Later promoted to Area Supervisor
  • Worked with the owner’s chartered accountant. Acquired GED. Applied and accepted into Westervelt College, London for the Business Administration program

Middle Years

  • Graduated with Honours, awarded “Outstanding Student Cooperation” by faculty, plus received first year exemption from the Certified General Accountant’s program.  Served as Newsletter Editor and Copywriter, plus elected as Student Council Treasurer. Team member for the development of a sales and marketing board game
  • Relocated to Toronto and recruited by Levi Strauss & Co. (Canada) Inc. as the Financial Planning Budget Clerk. Responsible for assisting the team of three planners with the company’s five-year forecast by developing spreadsheets to download database information for ease of reporting. Also monitored and reported on capital expenditures
  • Recruited by Operations department as a Production Planner for the company’s contractors. For five years served as the daily liaison between several contractor production facilities across Canada and between several internal departments. Visited contractor sites in Toronto, Three Rivers in Quebec, and Vancouver to train contractor managers on updating our database with production numbers, plus as raw and finished goods auditors during inventory counts
  • Proposed, developed, co-implemented, and trained nine planners on the automated (spreadsheet) master production schedule we used to download database forecasts to plan production. Process eliminated one week per month from the monthly planning cycle. My efforts were recognized for above-an- beyond-the-call-of-duty performance in the company’s international newsletter
  • Concurrently worked with a psychologist to deal with early traumas. Encouraged to enrol into university. Accepted into York University Bachelor of Science program, psychology major, social sciences minor for part-time studies
  • Recruited as Human Resources Salary and Budget Manager Assistant. Also supported the human resources assistants and the HRIS database, plus processed executive expense reports, managed the employee service awards, and served as secretary to the job evaluation team
  • Proposed a team-building workshop to the director for the head office and production facilities’ human resources managers and their human resources assistants. Worked with consultant on the planning and delivering the two-day program
  • Also concurrently, for six of the seven years with Levi’s, served as volunteer Treasurer and member of the Community Involvement Team
  • Left Levi’s to pursue full-time university studies

Later Years

  • Essay writing and my writing accomplishments rekindled a childhood passion. Published, including professionally by the university, libraries, trade magazines, and anthologies, one of which was dedicated to Lake Huron communities that also included a press event with all the contributing authors and poets
  • Discussion with my humanities professor resulted in my leaving university to re-evaluate what I really wanted to do versus what I could do, plus how I wanted to help people. As a result, worked various low level jobs to take time and explore possibilities
  • Evening and weekend Mackenzie Gallery Storefront Manager for four years. Upsold owner and framer sales by providing customers with diverse and more original, expensive framing options for prints and original artwork. Responsible for customer accounts, banking, hiring, training, and hosting artist signing events, with celebrity wildlife artists such as Robert Bateman
  • Put writing on the back burner and focused on design and communication arts at Durham College. Switched to visual arts at George Brown with relocation to Toronto. Two courses are pending for my diploma. However, even before my art studies, I was awarded an Ontario Arts Council Exhibition Grant for one of my solo exhibitions. Sourced unusual spaces and libraries for solo exhibitions, joined art councils, and participated in juried art exhibitions. Started my own company, Kaitlin Ann Originals that resulted from my year-long participation in a self-employment program
  • Developed public speaking skills through Toastmasters and miscellaneous events
  • Performed in Ontario schools as an eight-foot puppet to a pre-recorded show
  • Worked for a family as a barn worker, groom, and exerciser with their competition heavy horses
  • Resumed writing when inspired to create a play, Charles Choice, for schools to address bullying in schools. The play is now part of my own company’s books and products and will be used as means for a production and video contest
  • Won Honourable Mention, Literature, for a Toronto short story contest
  • Founded two non-profits, Trees in Our Community and It is All About Respect Inc.  Discovered for-profit social business ventures are better means to independently achieve mission and goals. The same thesis for It is All About Respect Inc. now serves as the foundation for Connecting The Dots With The Respect Principle
  • Basic French Level I in continuing education studies

CONCLUSION

Even without conscious intent in some cases, I was inherently drawn to what was in my heart to do with my talents, but without a high enough “Respect Level” to foster the confidence to follow my heart, I have lived a life well below my abilities. Next to helping people, I have placed my most important passion, writing, on the bottom of my to-do list.

Yes, I do write, but I have tried to use my creativity in the wrong way in writing because I did not know better. I mistakenly thought my creative approach to format versus excellent use and knowledge of Standard English would compensate for my lack of confidence and skill development. My natural talent for spelling, always 100% in elementary and middle school, was not enough to compensate for the English Standard foundational knowledge I did not acquire because I did not attend high school. Yes, I acquired my GED, but instead of a high 80’s mark at Westervelt College, I could have achieved a high 90’s mark. With a solid Standard English foundation, I could have achieved more A’s and A+’s at York University for my essays rather than B’s and B+’s. As a professional writer, I would be more successful by now also if I had valued myself and my passions enough to pour my energy and focus on becoming a very good writer, and even a great writer.

Finally placing my passion and talent for writing on the same level as helping others, plus learning how to balance both with healthy boundaries has arrived. Yes, there is work to be done, but as the key creative, artistic director, founder, and president for my social business venture, Connecting The Dots With The Respect Principle, and its vast bank of intellectual capital I have and have yet to create means investing in the company’s primary asset, me as the writer and source of all its intellectual capital, is top priority as is writing for anyone with the same passion to help people of all ages.

Having the degrees to validate my knowledge would have opened more doors sooner, but the knowledge, experience, and expertise I have gained, regardless of the manner I have gained them, will open the right doors and the work I set out to do will still be accomplished because that is how I am built.

KAITLIN ANN TREPANIER

Advocate Innovator Writer Social Entrepreneur & Founder

Connecting The Dots With The Respect Principle

Smashwords interview @  www.smashwords.com

© All Rights Reserved 2014-2019 

May 21, 2019

Revised May 23, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Content Writer, Social Business Venture Entrepreneur, Angel Investors’ Contestant, and “The Dragons’ Den Guide to Investor-Ready Business Plans”

As one of the Hawk’s Nest contestants in the past few months, I was fortunate to receive helpful feedback on my social business venture vision and business plan from the evaluation team after my interview.

Though my idea made the second round, part of the strategic plan development meant I had to inform the panel I had decided to move back to the city, which meant I could no longer compete because I was going to be outside of the contest’s containment area.

This impacted my not making the finalists’ list; however, I was offered the opportunity to attend the pitch workshop and to connect with the local development corporation regarding other financial possibilities.

As part of my revised strategic plan, I initially thought the move to London was about getting a traditional administrative job, which I had experienced great success with over the years. However, by not recognizing and pushing my more current writing successes and entrepreneurial achievements, I was selling myself short and God has not been opening those doors for me as He has in the past, but has, in fact, been pushing me towards the writing and entrepreneurial doors.

So, after the analysis and evaluation, I know it is time again to adapt to what is needed next.

The first task is to rewrite my resume, highlighting my recent achievements and successes with writing, my social business venture, as well as, my previous administrative successes. I will continue to apply for jobs, however, only writing opportunities, which are increasingly becoming more important and, as a result, more available because many companies are recognizing they need in-house writers rather than just advertising agencies for special projects.

Second, is the rewriting of a new Executive Summary based on recent events to garner investor support for what I have discovered in book is my social business venture’s “Early Stage” investment stage since I have already proven my business concept (Seed Stage) and started the business (Start-up Stage) with Bootstrap funding, though it was stalled due to parental care needs.

The Hawk’s Nest contest I was in this spring was to provide winners with a $25,000 investment; however, I realize a larger investment will, in fact, reap the fastest turn-around since the core products are already developed and simply need to be delivered, starting this fall. Of course, there is a line-up of additional books, products, and services waiting to be developed when I have the resources and time that a cash investment will also provide.

On that note, it is time to get to work on the new resume, plus the pitch and executive summary, so as always, thanks for stopping by! And best wishes with your own strategic life plan … though, as I am learning, staying flexible and adaptable is key to reaping the benefits of the unexpected!

Respectfully,

Kaitlin Ann Trepanier, Writer, Social Entrepreneur, and The Respect Specialist.

Copy of the revised, July 3, 2016, Strategic Plan

© www.therespectprinciple.com All Rights Reserved.  

 

 

 

 

 

Seeing past personality types, learning styles, body types and beliefs … to see and swim a new way.

We are complex creatures and not one of us is the same as another. Even identical twins have differences although not necessarily obvious to the eye.

Knowing this fact, accepting this reality, can be the compelling reason for us to consider, and put into practice, the fresh perspective that will serve us all well to see past personality types, learning styles, body types and our unique blend of beliefs is to operate on one universal principle.

Of course, the ideal is love … unconditional love, but as evidenced by our past and present, just the idea of valuing … respecting each unique person is a tall order in our global culture of Disrespect. The taller order is actually learning how to respect … to value all life in our words and actions … every day … in all our relationships, connections and interactions.

A simple example of how we struggle with this idea and simply resort to our conditioned response of prejudice is what I have experienced with a personal goal: the process of changing my swimming style.

Water has pulled me into its depths all my life. As a child, I spent hours on the river’s edge and within no time at all, following my Dad’s example, my child’s body was slicing through the green water to cross to the other side of the river. Though I have been told I did not take well to the public swimming pool and provided lessons, my swimming skills demonstrate I nonetheless did learn different swim strokes as well as the basics of diving, but it was only recently I discovered my swimming style was called the Tarzan stroke.

For known and unknown reasons, my swimming style meant I kept my head lifted out and above the water. One of the known reasons, though not entirely understood why, was to stop water from going up my nose. Yet diving is one of my favorite aspects of swimming.

In fact, one year, after a tumultuous period of my life, I even taught myself how to swan dive. Till then, I had never learned successfully how to use a spring diving board, so learning how to swan dive meant observing all users of spring boards and of course, especially the children, with their lack of fear and their bold fun who taught me to just let go and get comfortable with falling in the water in all kinds of ways; which also meant letting to of what people thought of a grown woman flopping into a pool as I grew accustomed to being out of control, so I could gain more trust in the process to achieve my goal.

In one winter season, my unconventional learning style did result in my ability to spring my body high into the air with arms spread wide and legs pulled together in proper form before my arms returned to their entry position as my body curved and sliced the pool’s surface. Sometimes on my entries my body was more rolled than straight and into an underwater somersault my body would roll. Sometimes my body was so straight and pointed, down to the bottom my arrowed body would rush. And sometimes, my body would have just enough of a curve to take me down so far but then gracefully sweep me back up to the surface. Even without a camera, I knew I was successful in completing my goal because of the response from observers, including the lifeguards.

A few years ago when I moved back to the home of my late teens and twenties where one of the greatest bodies of water, Lake Huron, once challenged and strengthened my swimming abilities, I soon realized how much I had let my swimming strength diminish. Upon my return, I also discovered one of the newer challenges I wanted to experience, surfing, is becoming a growing popular sport at the town’s main beach because of the dynamics of the breakwall, piers and currents.

A significant water level drop since I owned property south of the town’s border and even south of the area known as Boiler Beach has resulted in significant lake changes, including rip currents that develop in between sandbars and beside piers; rip currents that can thrust even an accomplished swimmer across the surface of the water in seconds, leaving them disoriented and if not wise in the ways of these sometimes volatile waters, stranded in deep water, exhausted from fighting the water’s stronger force. Safe swimming, as well as surfing and any other water activity, is now best-managed by learning how rip currents work, how to get out of their often frightening grasp, more safety strategies and tools, plus stronger swimming skills for this great lake.

For me, stronger swimming skills translates into face-in-the water comfort by learning to swim the crawl as opposed to wasting energy trying to keep myself alive by keeping my head above water at all times by swimming the energy-zapping Tarzan stroke. Changing a fifty-year style of swimming has not been easy or as quick as some would hope … especially people with different personality types, learning styles, body types and beliefs.

As a result of a lot of personal work, I know me very well these days and that includes the recognition none of the above … personality types, learning style, body types and even beliefs are the same as the majority. First, many people like constant attention while learning. In contrast, I excel when I gather new information and then go off on my own to practice and experiment because someone constantly talking at me is a distraction to me, but welcomed by other personality types. When I need more information, I come back for more, taking all the pieces and working on them individually before I start integrating them. For example, two of the biggest challenges I faced was getting used to putting my face horizontal in the water and learning how to breathe as I lifted my face partially out of the water, first to the right and eventually also to the left. Changing my kick from a thrust to a constant flutter meant developing the muscles in my hips and legs in new ways. Then there were the goggles, the bathing cap, getting the arm strokes coordinated with the breathing and the face in the water plus the new style of kick, etc.

Knowing what I know about my personality type, learning style and even body type, I should have known better than to take lessons in a big class with so many swimmers who, as it turns out, already swim the way I was there to learn how to do.

So, after two classes, I took the information provided, did some research of my own and started swimming on my own, breaking down old habits and instilling new ones, which, of course is taking time, though in truth it has only been a few months. Still, I find several people are quick to share their opinions about what I am doing wrong even though they know nothing about me other than what they see in their mind snapshots of my swimming endeavors.

Yet I know, if observers do not have the same personality type as I they will not understand how I work well on my own, breaking down big pictures into the details in order to construct a new big picture. They will not know that my body type is first a sprinter, excelling in activities that require quick and short bursts of great speed and that in order for me to become an endurance performer, I first have to train my body and mind with how it works best … using my natural speed with an element at a time until I can bring all the elements together quickly … in a flash, so I can experience what the new way of swimming I am striving for feels like … so I can build that feeling into my endurance training and goals.

“You swim too fast, your head is not deep enough in the water, you need a camera with video to watch your form,” are just some of the comments and suggestions I have heard, albeit, no doubt with good intentions, but yet at the same time this experience greatly demonstrates how we like, prefer even, everyone to be like us … to do as we do, to act as we act, to think as we think, to learn as we learn … and yet, no matter how much we may try, we are not like anyone else … and never will be without losing our own identity. We, each of us, are unique combinations of a number of factors, none of which is duplicated in anyone else.

Learning to appreciate we are not like everyone else and to understand that our differences from others does not make us or anyone else wrong, but just different is a very important step in making our world a safer and more peaceful place to live.

Valuing … respecting our differences, as well as our similarity in being unique creatures, is a huge step in making our world the safer and the most peaceful place we all want to live.

Hmmm, on that note, it is off to the pool I go in a few hours to recapture the new feeling I experienced during my last swim session when everything finally came together … speed, stroke, right and left breathing. Now I can begin to refine my form and build up my endurance so I will be ready this summer to be the swimmer and surfer I envision myself to be.

March 17, 2014

Kaitlin A. Trepanier
http://www.kaitlinatrepanier.com

All Rights Reserved by DARK HORSES PRODUCTIONS/KAITLIN A. TREPANIER … CREATIVE WRITER, ADVOCATE, and PROJECT SPECIALIST responsible for the creation of the global initiative Connecting the Dots … with The RESPECT PRINCIPLE … because every child … every person … should know, by their own experience, they are valued … RESPECTED.

Connecting “Prejudice” … with The RESPECT PRINCIPLE … Special Feature “Scientific American’s Our Unconscious Mind” Article

As with any word people can have variations on a word’s definition, but a word like prejudice is fairly straightforward. Its spelling defines its meaning. Prejudice is simply our act of pre-judging something … a person, place, experience, belief, etc., but history and the present show globally how we perceive some prejudices as small and acceptable and some as big and unacceptable, all of which are dependent on a number of variables … most of them harmful and even dangerous.

However, based on the Connecting the Dots … with the RESPECT PRINCIPLE, our prejudice variables are greatly influenced by our internalized and our community’s externalized RESPECT LEVEL.

Before proceeding, let’s keep in mind that most of what drives our unconscious thoughts and actions is a deep, negative, global conditioning I call the Disrespect Philosophy … the core belief that no one is worthy or entitled to be valued … respected … without some qualifier … without someone’s or some stamp of approval by some group … and this is the root of both our small and big prejudices … and fortuitously the January 2014 Scientific American confirms my premise that our unconscious mind drives more of our thoughts and actions than perhaps we care to acknowledge … Check this out

Journal of Scientific American
January 2014 (Psychology)

Our Unconscious Mind
Article Pages 30-37

By John A. Bargh, a professor of psychology at Yale University. His Automaticity in Cognition, Motivation and Evaluation Lab at Yale investigates unconscious influences on behavior and questions such as to the extent of what free will exists.

Unconscious impulses and desires impel what we think and do in ways Freud never dreamed of.

IN BRIEF (4 boxes on bottom of page 32)

DECISION MAKING often occurs without people giving much conscious thought to how they vote, what they buy, where they go on vacation or the way they negotiate a myriad of other life choices.

UNCONSCIOUS PROCESSES underlie the way we deliberate and plan our lives – and for good reason. Automatic judgments, for one, are essential for dodging on oncoming car or bus.

BEHAVIORS governed by the unconscious go beyond looking both ways at the corner. Embedded attitudes below the level of awareness shape many of our attitudes toward others.

SIGMUND FREUD meditated on the meaning of the unconscious throughout his career. These newer studies provide a more pragmatic perspective on how we relate to a boss or spouse.

When psychologists try to understand the way our mind works, they frequently come to a conclusion that may seem startling: people often make decisions without having given them much thought – or, more precisely, before they have thought about them consciously. When we decide how to vote, what to buy, where to go on vacation and myriad other things, unconscious thoughts that we are not even aware of typically play a big role. Research has recently brought to light just how profoundly our unconscious mind shapes our day-to-day interactions. Page 32

Post-Freudian psychology has set aside the id and the ego for a more pragmatic take on what defines our unconscious self. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman has described the modern distinction between the automatic and the controlled. In his best-selling book, Thinking Fast and Slow
… Top left column, page 33

The unconscious way we perceive people during the course of the day is a reflexive action. We must exert wilful, conscious effort to put aside the unexplained and sometimes unwarranted negative feelings that we may harbor towards others. The stronger the unconscious influence, the harder we have to work consciously to overcome it … The ability to regulate our own behavior-whether making friends, getting up to speed at a new job or overcoming a drinking problem-depends on more than genes, temperament and social support networks. It also hinges, in no small measure, on our capacity to identify and try to overcome the automatic impulses and emotions that in influence every aspect of our waking life. To make our way in the world, we need to learn to come to terms with our unconscious self. Mid-page of page 33

GUT REACTIONS
When we meet someone new, we form a first impression even before striking up a conversation. We may observe the person’s race, sex or age-features that, once perceived, automatically connect to our internalized stereotypes about how members of a particular group are apt to behave. These assumptions … Bottom left column, page 33

CHECK OUT the COLOR TEST on the top right column of page 33

OUT OF CONTROL
Unconscious thoughts and feelings influence not only the way we perceive ourselves and the world around us but also our everyday actions. Bottom right page 34

EMBODIED COGNITION
Some of the research on the unconscious and behavior focuses on the way the surrounding physical environment influences our psychological state of mind. Bottom left page 36

Why Some Social Science Studies Fail on top of page 34
…Still, the overall body of evidence collected so far clearly shows that unconscious influences on judgment, emotion, behavior and motivation are of practical importance both to society as a whole and to the everyday lives of its members.

FREUD REDUX
… that means we can set aside antiquated notions of Oedipus complexes and accept the reality that the unconscious assets its presence in every moment of our lives, when we are fully awake as well as when we are absorbed in the depths of a dream.

NOW AVAILABLE online or you can watch the author talk about how the unconscious affects our behaviors at ScientificAmerican.com/jan2014/unconscious

In the end, prejudice, like unhealthy competition, compels us to constantly judge others in contrast to ourselves. When people do not mirror us and our beliefs, we pre-judge them as unworthy or wrong or even dangerous because people with low RESPECT LEVELS believe other people must be like them in order to be approved, to feel safe with and therefore worthy of respect in their interactions with them.

To end what was, awareness is the beginning, but a global culture shift in our driving unconscious Disrespect Philosophy is ultimately the change agent we need to create a better world for all life to thrive.

February 9 and 11, 2014

Kaitlin A. Trepanier
http://www.kaitlinatrepanier.com

All Rights Reserved by DARK HORSES PRODUCTIONS/KAITLIN A. TREPANIER, Getting YOU the RESPECT YOU Want … Connecting the Dots … with The RESPECT PRINCIPLE Developer, Author, Speaker, Playwright, Altruistic Entrepreneur, and Human Rights Activist … because every child … every person … should know, by their own experience, they are valued … RESPECTED.

Thought Food of the Day … How do you keep the balance between confidence, assuredness and boldness … pride and arrogance?

Thought Food of the Day

Thinking about the balance needed to be an artist, writer or entrepreneur … there seems to be a fine line between being confident, assured and bold in displaying and promoting one’s creations, regardless of the product or service, and being considered arrogant and prideful … yet, people who are job searching in order to work for someone else … for someone who had started a business they now want to work for … are counselled to demonstrate confidence, assuredness and boldness … so I’m wondering why it seems to be more acceptable to sell yourself to get a job or promote some other person’s creativity or thoughts, but not so acceptable when you’ve created something of your own … be it an artistic creation, something written or some other product or service … just some considerations as I work on my own balancing act.

Of course, I am also wondering … What are your thoughts on this subject?

January 27, 2014

Kaitlin A. Trepanier
http://www.kaitlinatrepanier.com

All Rights Reserved by DARK HORSES PRODUCTIONS/KAITLIN A. TREPANIER, Getting YOU the RESPECT YOU Want … Connecting the Dots … with The RESPECT PRINCIPLE Developer, Author, Speaker, Playwright, Altruistic Entrepreneur, and Human Rights Activist … because every child … every person … should know, by their own experience, they are valued … RESPECTED.

“You are not defined …”

“You are not defined by your past. You are prepared by your past.”

This passage from #1 New York Bestselling Author Joel Osteen’s book, Break Out, struck a deep chord within me yesterday as I am “breaking free,” like the DARK HORSE I became after my first attempt almost twenty years ago to become who I really am … a very unique individual with an unconventional personality type, perspective, and a drive for a different life from the “normal” I was born into and lived in most of my life … at great cost to myself and to my family and society … because when we do not live true to our heart, our heart will close its doors to living a life that is a lie because it is not a reflection of who we really are … and ultimately we all lose when we treat ourselves so disrespectfully.

Like you, I am not defined by my past, but it has certainly prepared me for my future … the one in my heart I have always known I am meant to be … and the one I am embracing as I move forward into the life my heart tells me I am destined to live.

Thank you “past” for my “future.” And thank you Joel Osteen for being the writer and messenger you are too.

December 11, 2013

Kaitlin A. Trepanier
http://www.kaitlinatrepanier.com

All Rights Reserved by DARK HORSES PRODUCTIONS/KAITLIN A. TREPANIER, Connecting the Dots … with The RESPECT PRINCIPLE Developer, Author, Speaker, Playwright, Altruistic Entrepreneur, and Human Rights Activist … because every child … every person … should know, by their own experience, they are valued … RESPECTED.